Château D'yquem

Château d'Yquem

Sauternes Sémillon-Sauvignon Blanc Blend 2016

David T
9.5

Time for dessert!!!

The nose shows; white peach, apricots, dry pineapple, Bosc pear, dry tropical melons, marmalade, honey, orange citrus and blossoms, nuts, toffee, banana peel, burnt caramel, brown raw sugar, baguette crust, soft limestone minerals and floral spring flowers.

The body is thick, gluey and rich and has lots of residual sugar. White peach, apricots, dry pineapple, Bosc pear, dry tropical melons, marmalade, honey, orange citrus and blossoms, nuts, toffee, banana peel, burnt caramel, brown raw sugar, baguette crust, soft limestone minerals and spring flowers. The acidity is beautiful, thick and round. The finish is well balanced and elegant with polish on the finish for days.

Photos of; Chateau d’ Yquem, their tasting room, 1917 bottle of d’ Yquem and botrytis grapes and their barrel room.
— 19 days ago

Ryan, E and 17 others liked this
Severn Goodwin

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Nice score, such a youthful bottle!
David T

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@Severn Goodwin That’s what tastings are all about.

Clos Baudoin

Clos Baudoin Vouvray Chenin Blanc 1989

Still drinking the 89 while storing at temps rainging from 50 to 90 degrees F for the last 22 years. 2 bottles left. Not one bottle in all thes years was less than perfect. I would rate it as a 98.5, but, i am no expert. I have had great assulase, tokaji aszu and chateau d'Yquem but, for the price i paid (20$/bottle), it far exceeds the others. It is now a medium amber color complex fruity tones great finish. I feel sad when the last drop leaves my teast buds. I also have a few of the 90's to us as a comparison. They are a distant second. — a year ago

Château Climens

Sauternes-Barsac Sémillon-Sauvignon Blanc Blend 2005

David T
9.5

On the nose; marmalade, apricots, peach, white peach, dry pineapple, orange peel, candied lemon, toffee, brandy butter, nuts, brown sugar, molasses, honey, sweet minerals, sea spray and yellow lilies. The palate matches the nose but add spiced cinnamon. The mouthfeel is thick, super rich and luscious. Delicate minerality. The acidity rains on the palate and the finish is endless. My 2nd favorite Sauternes after Chateau d'Yquem. I component tasted at this Chateau in 2014. Not just the grapes varietals separately but also when those grapes were picked. They might make 12 or more passes through the vineyards to make sure they only take fruit at it's peak ripeness. After you do this, you'll never taste Sauternes the same way. I find myself mentally picking it apart and putting back together as it swirls on my palate. — 2 years ago

Chris, Severn and 11 others liked this

Producteurs Plaimont

Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh Saint-Martin White Blend 2010

Looks like chateau d'Yquem. Could drink it all day long- reminiscent of flavor of chateau as well — 3 years ago

Château Rieussec

Sauternes Sémillon-Sauvignon Blanc Blend 1983

David T
9.4

Dessert last night was a layered, guava, mango, raspberry, passion fruit cheesecake. I did a dual pair with 14 Kobalt Sauvignon Blanc and this 83 Rieussec Sauternes. The 83 won hands down.

Look at that color! 👀 The older they are, the darker they get. I’ve seen one nearly black, a 1928 D'yquem a number of years back. A good producer/vintage of Sauternes will out live almost anyone’s life span properly stored. This 35 year old 375ml was no exception to that rule.

The nose reveals; brown sugar, molasses, dried; pineapple, apricots, peaches, nectarines, orange citrus, touch of light colored citrus’s, marmalade, mixed nuts with skin, toffee, caramel, tea notes, soft limestone minerals, gravel with pebbles and dark withering flowers/lilies.

The body is full, rich and gorgeous. The palate is nicely integrated and complex. The fruits are a combination of candies and dried. Brown sugar, raw sugar cane, molasses, dried; pineapple, apricots, peaches, nectarines, mango, prunes & dates. Candied, lemon, lime & grapefruit. Orange citrus, marmalade, honeycomb, mixed nuts with skin, toffee, caramel, Lipton tea notes, soft limestone minerals, gravel with pebbles and dark withering flowers, yellow & orange lilies. The acidity is like a rain shower and the elegant, rich, well balanced and polished finish lingers on your palate and dances mentally in your brain. There is also granulated sugar on the palate. Huge RS!

Producer notes...Rieussec is aged in an average of 50% new, French oak barrels for 18 to 24 months, depending on the character of the vintage. Chateau Rieussec is owned by the Lafite side of the Rothschild family and all their used oak barrels come from Chateau Lafite.

Photos of; Chateau Rieussec, grapes awaiting the onset of botrytis, their roughly 25-30 year Estate vines and their barrel room.
— 9 months ago

Severn, Paul and 20 others liked this
Severn Goodwin

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I can't allow a Sauternes to out live me, it shall be consumed with a smile.
David T

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@Severn Goodwin As it should be! I was only referencing their longevity.

Taylor Fladgate

Vintage Port Blend 1963

B
10

1963 Taylor Fladgate Port. Wine charity dinner bought by H&C S, hosted at the house. Dessert course. Drank alongside '75 Chateau d'Yquem. This was delicious w the salted caramel. Easier than the d'Yquem to sip without food. Great! — 3 years ago

Eschenauer & Co.

Chateau d'Yquem Haut Sauternes Sémillon-Sauvignon Blanc Blend 1918

Great way to finish! Drinking much younger than its age with a golden yellow color. — 8 months ago

Eric, Ira and 9 others liked this
Tom Casagrande

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World War I. My God.

Château Rabaud-Promis

Premier Grand Cru Classe Sauternes Sémillon-Sauvignon Blanc Blend 2011

Located opposite the Chateau d'Yquem, the Rabaud-Promis castle, on the hill Rabaud since the late eighteenth century. Sweet stone fruit aromas with hints of honey. On the palate full flavors of orange and peach with notes of citrus notes adding a bit of spice. Balanced acidity, rich finish ending with botrytis-like character. Very nice! — a year ago

Velma, Ken and 2 others liked this

Krug

Brut Champagne Rosé Blend

David T
9.5

There are certain occasions that call for Krug Rosé. So, HBTM! The bottle was corked in the summer of 2014. It’s a blend of 45 reserve wines with the oldest being from 2007 and the youngest 2002. This is why I think Champagne Makers are some of the most talented people making wine. They are constantly blending up to 100 plus wines to bring that bottle to bottle and year to year branded flavor of consistency. On the nose; red & pink spring flowers, cherries, strawberries, watermelon, black cherry, black raspberries, notes of blood orange citrus, baked bread, soft volcanic mineral and elegant chalkiness. The palate is always ridiculously delicate. Micro bubbles, silky rich texture with beautiful soft acidity. The palate fruits are similar to the nose; rich & ripe cherries, strawberries watermelon, black cherry, black raspberries, notes of blood orange citrus with hints of marmalade. Red & pink spring flowers, baguette crust, soft powdery minerals that give the palate a slight sting and super powdery chalkiness done just right. The finish is beautifully rich, textured, revealing itself in layers and lasts minutes. Photos of; Founder Joseph Krug, House of Krug, Winemaker Eric Lebel, Krug’s Clos du Mesnil, a small plot of 1.85 hectares of Chardonnay...one of the world’s greatest vineyards and their salon tasting room. Producer history & notes...Krug was founded by Joseph Krug in 1853. They are based in Reims, the main city in France’s Champagne region. It is one of the famous Champagne houses that formed part of the Grande Marques. Today the house is majority owned by the multinational conglomerate LVMH, which owns Moët Hennessy, Louis Vuitton S.A. and who’s wine producer portfolio includes other well known wine brands such as; Moët & Chandon, Veuve Clicquot, Château d'Yquem, Ruinart & Cheval Blanc, Dom Perignon and many others. Despite LVMH's majority ownership, the family is still actively involved in all the key decisions of the house but does not manage the day-to-day operations. Joseph Krug was born Johann-Joseph Krug, a butcher’s son, in Mainz, on the Rhine in 1800 when the city was part of the Napoleonic Empire. Having dispensed with the name Johann, he left Mainz in 1824 and in 1834 moved on to Paris. Germans were in demand in France as accountants and bookkeepers. So, Joseph joined Champagne Jacquesson in Châlons-sur-Marne. He spent eight years with Jacquesson. His work took him beyond accountancy. He went around Europe testing the market and assessing criticism from wine sellers and customers. He learned about composition and taste so that by 1840 he already seemed to have been blending Champagne for at least one other house. In 1841, he married Emma-Anne Jaunay. The daughter of a French hotelier based in London’s Leicester Square. The following year their son Paul Krug was born. In 1842 he moved to Reims and following a year later, Krug et Cie was founded with his partner, Hyppolite de Vivès. Joseph was fluent in French, English and German and even spoke some Russian, putting the company in position to exploit key overseas markets. Joseph died in 1866 and was succeeded by his son Paul Krug, who had been trained by his father to takeover. Joseph under the supervision of Paul, Krug was established as a Grande Marque. By the 1880s the prestige of Krug was acknowledged in the United Kingdom and became the primary overseas market for Champagne. In 1866, the House moved into Rue Coquebert, in Reims as it remains. After Paul’s death in 1910, he was succeeded by his son, Joseph Krug II. However, during World War I Joseph II was taken prisoner and his wife Jeanne played a key role in the House at a time when the Western Front divided the region between the Allies and the Germans. After the war, Joseph II’s slow recovery led to his nephew Jean Seydoux becoming joint manager in 1924. In that decade, the Krug 1926 and 1928 vintages were created, which have been considered by critics to be amongst the greatest Champagnes. Lawyer and wine writer Maurice Healey declared “Krug” the king of all Champagnes. Further, “that the 1928 Krug was the best wine made in the present century.” By the mid-1930s, Paul Krug II, the son of Joseph II, was active in the business and would become head of the House from 1959 to 1977. His father died in 1967, by which time he was, according to Patrick Forbes, “one of the most popular and respected figures in the Champagne district.” In 1962 Henri Krug, the son of Paul II, joined the management, as did his brother Remi three years later. Their arrival was followed by a series of innovations, including extensions in the range of Champagnes. In 1979, for the first time, a graduate winemaker joined the House. In January 1999, the House became part of LVMH and by 2007, the brothers, while remaining on the tasting committee, had stepped down from day-to-day responsibilities. In 2009 Olivier Krug, the son of Henri, became House Director. At harvest, Krug grapes are pressed close to their plots with the first juice kept for 24 hours in a vat prepared for the fermentation stage. The pressing from each plot is vinified separately. A pressing contains 4,000 kilos of grapes and yields 20.5 hectolitres of first juice (cuvée), which is poured into twelve oak casks chosen at random. Once fermentation is complete, the eleventh and twelfth casks are used to top up the other ten casks in order to protect the new wines from oxidation. For fifteen days, each cask is topped up with wine from the same plot. Krug uses small 205 liter oak casks tailor-made from trees that are more than two centuries old in the forests of Hautes Futaies in Central France. The average age of Krug oak casks is 20 years. They are retired after approximately 40 years of use. The wines remain in the casks for several weeks. During this period, clarification occurs naturally from the cool temperature of the cellar given the coming winter, as does a micro-oxygenation process from the use of natural containers, making the wine more resistant to oxygen over time. Finally, between December and January, the wine is drawn off into small stainless-steel vats. From here, depending on the decisions of Krug’s tasting committee, the wines will either contribute to that year’s assemblage or be stored in steel vats in the House’s library of 150 reserve wines to be used in the blend of a future Krug Grande Cuvée and or Krug Rosé. — 2 years ago

Eric, Shay and 28 others liked this
David T

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@Isaac Pirolo Thanks. Cheers 🥂
Sharon B

Sharon B

Thanks for the history info! I love reading about it
David T

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@Sharon B Thank you.