Thomas Hardy & Sons

Thomas Hardy & Sons

Trackers Crossing 365 Chardonnay 2016

Looking at the reviews I was surprised so low for an $8 wine. I am enjoying this. Tastes more sweet than tart. Not able to identify fruit but I guess more like a ripe tropical fruit. — 2 months ago

Paul liked this

Château Lynch-Bages

Pauillac Red Bordeaux Blend 2000

David T
9.5

The 2000 is delicious but, it is evolving at a glacial pace. Out of magnum.

On the nose, touch of barnyard, glycerin, ripe; blackberries, dark cherries, black raspberries, plum, strawberries & cherries. Vanilla, dry clay, limestone, river stones, just a touch of pyrazines & bandaid, dark,,turned, moist earth, dry grass and dry & fresh dark florals.

The body is full, round & sexy. Dry softened, sweet tannins. ripe; blackberries, dark cherries, black raspberries, plum, strawberries & cherries. Vanilla, dry clay, limestone, river stones, just a touch of pyrazines & bandaid, fresh tobacco leaf, saddle-wood, dry underbrush, dark, turned, moist earth, dry grass and dry & fresh dark florals. The acidity is magnificent. The structure, tension, length and balance are sensational. The finish is drop dead gorgeous. I’d still hold mine another 5 years as long as you have 3-4 bottles for more 5 year increments.

Photos of, their Estate vines, Clyde Beffa-Owner of K&L Wine Merchants, Owner of Chateau Lynch Bages - Jean-Michel Cazes, guests of the dinner and a sunset view from their Estate.

Producer notes and history...Lynch Bages takes its name from the local area where the Chateau is located in Bages. The vineyard of what was to become Lynch Bages was established and then expanded by the Dejean family who sold it in 1728 to Pierre Drouillard.

In 1749, Drouillard bequeathed the estate to his daughter Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Lynch. This is how the estate came to belong to the Lynch family, where it remained for seventy-five years and received the name Lynch Bages. However, it was not always known under that name.

For a while the wines were sold under the name of Jurine Bages. In fact, when the estate was Classified in the 1855 Classification of the Medoc, the wines were selling under the name of Chateau Jurine Bages. That is because the property was owned at the time by a Swiss wine merchant, Sebastien Jurine.

In 1862, the property was sold to the Cayrou brothers who restored the estate’s name to Chateau Lynch family.

Around 1870, Lou Janou Cazes and his wife Angelique were living in Pauillac, close to Chateau Pichon Longueville Baron. It was here that Jean-Charles Cazes, the couple’s second son, was born in 1877.

In the 1930’s, Jean-Charles Cazes, who was already in charge of Les-Ormes-de-Pez in St. Estephe agreed to lease the vines of Lynch Bages. By that time, the Cazes family had history in Bordeaux dating back to the second half of the nineteenth century.

This agreement to take over Lynch Bages was good for both the owner and Jean Charles Cazes. Because, the vineyards had become dilapidated and were in need of expensive replanting, which was too expensive for the owner. However, for Cazes, this represented an opportunity, as he had the time, and the ability to manage Lynch Bages, but he lacked the funds to buy the vineyard.

Jean-Charles Cazes eventually purchased both properties on the eve of the Second World War. Lynch Bages and Les-Ormes-de-Pez have been run by the Cazes family ever since. In 1988, the Cazes family added to their holdings in Bordeaux when they purchased an estate in the Graves region, Chateau Villa Bel Air.

Around 1970, they increased their vineyards with the purchase of Haut-Bages Averous and Saussus. By the late 1990’s their holdings had expanded to nearly 100 hectares! Jean-Michel Cazes who had been employed as an engineer in Paris, joined the wine trade in 1973. In a short time, Jean Michel Cazes modernized everything at Lynch Bages.

He installed a new vat room, insulated the buildings, developing new technologies and equipment, built storage cellars, restored the loading areas and wine storehouses over the next fifteen years. During that time period, Jean Michel Cazes was the unofficial ambassador of not just the Left Bank, but all of Bordeaux. Jean Michel Cazes was one of the first Chateau owners to begin promoting their wine in China back in 1986.

Bages became the first wine sent into space, when a French astronaut carried a bottle of 1975 Lynch Bages with him on the joint American/French space flight!

Beginning in 1987, Jean-Michel Cazes joined the team at the insurance company AXA, who wanted to build an investment portfolio of quality vineyards in the Medoc, Pomerol, Sauternes, Portugal and Hungary.

Jean-Michel Cazes was named the director of the wine division and all the estates including of course, the neighboring, Second Growth, Chateau Pichon Baron.

June 1989 marked the inauguration of the new wine making facilities at Lynch Bages, which was on of their best vintages. 1989 also marked the debut of the Cordeillan- hotel and restaurant where Sofia and I had one of our best dinners ever. A few years after that, the Village de Bages with its shops was born.

The following year, in 1990, the estate began making white wine, Blanc de Lynch Bages. In 2001, the Cazes family company bought vineyards in the Rhone Valley in the Languedoc appellation, as well as in Australia and Portugal. They added to their holdings a few years later when they purchased a vineyard in Chateauneuf du Pape.

In 2006, Jean-Charles Cazes took over as the managing director of Chateau Lynch Bages. Jean-Michel Cazes continues to lead the wine and tourism division of the family’s activities. Due to their constant promotion in the Asian market, Chateau Lynch Bages remains one of the strongest brands in the Asian market, especially in China.

In 2017, Chateau Lynch Bages began a massive renovation and modernization, focusing on their wine making, and technical facilities. The project, headed by the noted architects Chien Chung Pei and Li Chung Pei, the sons of the famous architect that designed the glass pyramid for the Louvre in Paris as well as several other important buildings.

The project will be completed in 2019. This includes a new grape, reception center, gravity flow wine cellar and the vat rooms, which will house at least, 80 stainless steel vats in various sizes allowing for parcel by parcel vinification.

The new cellars will feature a glass roof, terraces with 360 degree views and completely modernized reception areas and offices. They are not seeing visitors until it’s completion.

In March, 2017, they purchased Chateau Haut Batailley from Françoise Des Brest Borie giving the Cazes family over 120 hectares of vines in Pauillac!

The 100 hectare vineyard of Lynch Bages is planted to 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 17% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot. The vineyard has a terroir of gravel, chalk and sand soils.

The vineyard can be divided into two main sections, with a large portion of the vines being planted close to the Chateau on the Bages plateau. At their peak, the vineyard reaches an elevation of 20 meters. The other section of the vineyard lies further north, with its key terroir placed on the Monferan plateau.

They also own vines in the far southwest of the appellation, next Chateau Pichon Lalande, on the St. Julien border, which can be used in the Grand Vin. The vineyard can be split into four main blocks, which can be further subdivided into 140 separate parcels.

The average age of the vines is about 30 years old. But they have old vines, some of which are close to 90 years old.

The vineyards are planted to a vine density of 9,000 vines per hectare. The average age of the vines is about 30 years old. But they have old vines, some of which are close to 90 years old.

Lynch Bages also six hectares of vine are reserved for the production of the white Bordeaux wine of Chateau Lynch Bages. Those vines are located to the west of the estate. They are planted to 53% Sauvignon Blanc, 32% Semillon and 15% Muscadelle. On average, those vines are about 20 years of age. Lynch Bages Blanc made its debut in 1990.

To produce the wine of Chateau Lynch Bages, vinification takes place 35 stainless steel vats that vary in size. Malolactic fermentation takes place in a combination of 30% French, oak barrels with the remainder taking place in tank.

The wine of Chateau Lynch Bages is aged in an average of 70% new, French oak barrels for between 12 and 15 months. Due to the appellation laws of Pauillac, the wine is sold as a generic AOC Bordeaux Blanc, because Pauillac does not allow for the plantings of white wine grapes.

For the vinification of their white, Bordeaux wine, Blanc de Lynch-Bages is vinified in a combination of 50% new, French oak barrels, 20% in one year old barrels and the remaining 30% is vinified in vats. The wine is aged on its lees for at least six months. The white wine is sold an AOC Bordeaux wine.

The annual production at Lynch Bages is close to 35,000 cases depending on the vintage.

The also make a 2nd wine, which was previously known as Chateau Chateau Haut Bages Averous. However, the estate changed its name to Echo de Lynch Bages beginning with the 2007 vintage. The estate recently added a third wine, Pauillac de Lynch-Bages.



— 2 years ago

Daniel, Garrick and 42 others liked this
David T

David T Influencer Badge

@Dick Schinkel Thank you! Cheers! 🍷
Peggy Hadley

Peggy Hadley

OMG. Thanks for the novel. Great notes!
David T

David T Influencer Badge

@Peggy Hadley Thank you & sorry. I get a little carried away with Bordeaux producer history. Love their history, wines and the people that work so hard to make them.

Chalk Hill Wines

Alpha Crucis Titan Cabernet Sauvignon 2018

MICHAEL COOPER
9.1

This #cabernetsauvignon is very good. I didn’t like the Titan Shiraz though.
#mclarenvale is located around 30 km south of Adelaide at the northern end of the peninsula with the Gulf St. Vincent to the west and the Adelaide Hills to the east.
The region has warm to hot summers although winds blowing in off the Gulf and down from the Adelaide Hills moderate the climate and also keep the risk of disease low. Rainfall levels are relatively low during the growing season (usually less than 200mm), although winters can be fairly wet.
McLaren Vale has a particularly complex geology: many major soil types have been identified, varying from sand to loam to clay. In general, the soils in the north of the region are poor with lower levels of nutrients, whereas those in the south are deeper and more fertile, producing higher yields.
McLaren Vale is one of the oldest wine-producing regions in Australia. By the late 19th century, Thomas Hardy & Sons was producing wine and exporting to the UK. Fortified wine production dominated the first half of the 20th century but after World War II a wave of European immigrants, particularly from Italy, encouraged the return to dry red wine production. In the 1970s, the focus was on full- bodied, ripe Chardonnay and Semillon but, since the late 1980s and early 1990s, this has returned to red wine
It is a large region, with vineyards covering around 6,200ha , and so has a great diversity of microclimates. Proximity to the sea is one factor influencing vineyard climate, as is altitude: vineyards stretch from sea level to around 350m, with most planted on flat or gently undulating land between 50 and 250m.
Over 90 per cent of plantings are now black grape varieties.
premium priced wines, covering both single-varietal and blends. Shiraz is the most planted, with over half of total plantings, followed by Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache. McLaren Vale reds tend to be deep-coloured and full-bodied with high alcohol levels and pronounced dark fruit flavours. Many have spice characteristics from oak. In the hotter, lower sites, the fruit flavours can become cooked or jammy. Higher elevations give wines with higher acidity and tannins.
Production ranges from inexpensive, high volume bottlings to super-Premium
— 5 months ago

Robert, David and 9 others liked this

Thomas Hardy & Sons

Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon 1901

1991 opened in 2017 - beautiful! — 4 years ago

Hardys

Butcher's Gold The Thomas Hardy Chronicles Shiraz Sangiovese 2012

So glad I got two of these! A nice rich red — 5 years ago

Thomas George Estates

Sons & Daughters Rance Chardonnay 2017

Really solid rose from a local Russian River winery! — 5 months ago

J.W. Lees

Limited Edition Harvest Ale 2009

Matt Austin
9.3

Totally flat. Took a while to open up, but once it hit its stride it was hitting on all cylinders. Still a bit sweet compared to Thomas Hardy which keeps it from reaching greater heights. — a year ago

David liked this

George Gale & Co.

Prize Old Ale 1994

Matt Austin
9.7

Cork was nasty. Totally flat. Tastes like dusty closet toffee. Love it! A singular beer experience rivaled only by aged Thomas Hardy or JW Lees. — 4 years ago

Marc liked this

Thomas Hardy & Sons

Winemaker's Rare Shiraz 2008

Opaque black red color with very aromatic black fruit, oak, eucalyptus, dark choc, spice and white pepper aromas.  Just a tad hot.  On the palate it's full bodied ,dense, and concentrated with medium-acidity and plum, blackberry, black cherry, dark chocolate, and spice flavors.  Long finish.  Fruit from McLaren Vale, Clare Valley, and Frankland River.  Aged in French Oak.   — 6 years ago