J.M. Labruyere

Prologue Propriétaire de Vignes Grand Cru Champagne Blend

9.17 ratings
9.14 pro ratings
Champagne, France
Champagne Blend
Squash & Root Vegetables, Meaty & Oily Fish, Shellfish, Crab & Lobster, Cake & Cream, Soft Cheese, Hard Cheese, Salads & Greens, Salami & Prosciutto, Pork, Fish, Chicken, Duck, Onion, Shallot, Garlic, Nuts & Seeds, Fruit & Berries, Beans & Peas, Exotic Spices, Turkey, Pungent Cheese, Shellfish, Oyster
Top Notes For
Web Bond

2 April 2014 bottling(2013 vintage)
28 January 2019 disgorgement

2 April 2014 bottling(2013 vintage)
28 January 2019 disgorgement

Oct 12th, 2019
Connor Smith

The 17th century saw an explosion of beverage options in Europe. Spirits were coming into their own, flavoring with hops was finally the standard for beer, and chocolate, coffee, and tea began flowing from overseas. Wine was no longer the only kid on the block, and had to offer something new to stay on top.

Sparkles in wine due to second fermentations were nothing new, but it was the leap in English glassmaking technology in the 1620s with coal-firing that allowed them to be harnessed. No longer would there be constant risk of bottles exploding from pressure, and bubbles came ever more into vogue - much to the chagrin of the great advocates of still blanc de noirs Champagne, Dom Perignon and the Marquis de Saint-Evremond. But there was no holding back the tide, and by the end of the century sparkling Champagne was the drink of choice for high courts across Europe.

(This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured.)

The 17th century saw an explosion of beverage options in Europe. Spirits were coming into their own, flavoring with hops was finally the standard for beer, and chocolate, coffee, and tea began flowing from overseas. Wine was no longer the only kid on the block, and had to offer something new to stay on top.

Sparkles in wine due to second fermentations were nothing new, but it was the leap in English glassmaking technology in the 1620s with coal-firing that allowed them to be harnessed. No longer would there be constant risk of bottles exploding from pressure, and bubbles came ever more into vogue - much to the chagrin of the great advocates of still blanc de noirs Champagne, Dom Perignon and the Marquis de Saint-Evremond. But there was no holding back the tide, and by the end of the century sparkling Champagne was the drink of choice for high courts across Europe.

(This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured.)

Aug 20th, 2019
Web Bond

Verzenay Grand Cru

Verzenay Grand Cru

Nov 22nd, 2018
Tracy Hall

70% Pinot Noir, 30% Chardonnay. Flavors are lemon curd, pineapple and French toast. Very short (up front only) and fat on the finish. Disgorged June 27, 2016 dosage 4.8 g. SS

70% Pinot Noir, 30% Chardonnay. Flavors are lemon curd, pineapple and French toast. Very short (up front only) and fat on the finish. Disgorged June 27, 2016 dosage 4.8 g. SS

Nov 18th, 2017
Andrew Steffensmeier

Citrus tones lead the way. A fine bead. Hints of other tropical fruit behind. Toast and nice cut.

Citrus tones lead the way. A fine bead. Hints of other tropical fruit behind. Toast and nice cut.

Jan 7th, 2018
Aaron Feldman-Reich

Aaron had this 9 months ago

Aaron had this 9 months ago

Dec 31st, 2018