Ocean Eight

Mornington Peninsula Pinot Noir

9.32 ratings
-no pro ratings
Mornington Peninsula, Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia
Pinot Noir
Turkey, Game, Exotic Spices, Soft Cheese, Duck, Goose, Salads & Greens, Potato, Quinoa, Farro, Brown Rice, White Rice, Pasta, Herbs, Nuts & Seeds, Mushrooms, Chicken, Meaty & Oily Fish, Shellfish, Crab & Lobster, Stew, Onion, Shallot, Garlic, Salami & Prosciutto, Salmon, Quinoa, Shellfish
Top Notes For
Adriana Fabbro

At East Bay Nasty Women Pinot Noir tasting. This might have been my favorite of the line up. I immediately, confidently (and very incorrectly) called Burgundy (Cote de Beaune) based on the texture—lithe with silky tannins that are ever so slightly rustic on the finish. Lovely purity of fruit - tart red cherry, rhubarb. Savory/herbal finish reminded me of the Sonoma Coast. At one point, the fruit ripeness would have screamed new world but with warmer and dryer recent vintages in Burgundy, that’s no longer a given.

This producer, like nearly everyone else in the world making Pinot outside of burgundy, cited Burgundy as their influence and has spent a good deal of time there, but in this case it really shows. Of course, there are likely details that make this uniquely Mornington-Penninsula-esque and I can’t pretend that I’ve had nearly enough Australian Pinots (shame on me!) to tell you what those are. This is one of the coolest growing regions in Australia, and these vines are grown in soils with a high % of sand.
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Found this photo via search as I forgot to snap a bottle shot. I *think* the vintage was 2016.

At East Bay Nasty Women Pinot Noir tasting. This might have been my favorite of the line up. I immediately, confidently (and very incorrectly) called Burgundy (Cote de Beaune) based on the texture—lithe with silky tannins that are ever so slightly rustic on the finish. Lovely purity of fruit - tart red cherry, rhubarb. Savory/herbal finish reminded me of the Sonoma Coast. At one point, the fruit ripeness would have screamed new world but with warmer and dryer recent vintages in Burgundy, that’s no longer a given.

This producer, like nearly everyone else in the world making Pinot outside of burgundy, cited Burgundy as their influence and has spent a good deal of time there, but in this case it really shows. Of course, there are likely details that make this uniquely Mornington-Penninsula-esque and I can’t pretend that I’ve had nearly enough Australian Pinots (shame on me!) to tell you what those are. This is one of the coolest growing regions in Australia, and these vines are grown in soils with a high % of sand.
—-
Found this photo via search as I forgot to snap a bottle shot. I *think* the vintage was 2016.

May 24th, 2022
justin goh

justin had this 2 years ago

justin had this 2 years ago

May 12th, 2020