Louis Jadot

Domaine Gagey Les Drazeys Chambolle-Musigny Pinot Noir

9.32 ratings
-no pro ratings
Chambolle-Musigny, Côte de Nuits, Burgundy, France
Pinot Noir
Turkey, Game, Exotic Spices, Soft Cheese, Duck, Goose, Salads & Greens, Potato, Quinoa, Farro, Brown Rice, White Rice, Pasta, Herbs, Nuts & Seeds, Mushrooms, Chicken, Meaty & Oily Fish, Shellfish, Crab & Lobster, Stew, Onion, Shallot, Garlic, Salami & Prosciutto, Salmon, Quinoa, Shellfish
Top Notes For
Connor Smith

The French Revolution detonated everything about the old order of France, and wine was no exception - far from it. The great vineyards of Burgundy, that had been tended to and ached over by Benedictine and Cistercian monks for centuries, were confiscated and auctioned off to the petite bourgeoisie in Paris and Dijon. The Napoleonic inheritance code, which guaranteed an even split between all children, led to these ancient plots being further divided up with each passing generation.

It wasn't long before there was a multitude of disinterested Parisians who owned a few vines in the Cote d'Or as their birthright. Négociant houses, such as Louis Jadot, popped up to make deals with these small landholders, aggregate their scattered plots, and bring their wine to the world.

Modern Burgundy is still very much a reflection of its transformation during the Revolution, with some of the world’s most famous and valuable land portioned out into tiny parcels. It’s no wonder demand outstripped supply long ago!

(This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured)

The French Revolution detonated everything about the old order of France, and wine was no exception - far from it. The great vineyards of Burgundy, that had been tended to and ached over by Benedictine and Cistercian monks for centuries, were confiscated and auctioned off to the petite bourgeoisie in Paris and Dijon. The Napoleonic inheritance code, which guaranteed an even split between all children, led to these ancient plots being further divided up with each passing generation.

It wasn't long before there was a multitude of disinterested Parisians who owned a few vines in the Cote d'Or as their birthright. Négociant houses, such as Louis Jadot, popped up to make deals with these small landholders, aggregate their scattered plots, and bring their wine to the world.

Modern Burgundy is still very much a reflection of its transformation during the Revolution, with some of the world’s most famous and valuable land portioned out into tiny parcels. It’s no wonder demand outstripped supply long ago!

(This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured)

Aug 20th, 2019
James Cahill

'15 Jadot sampling

'15 Jadot sampling

Feb 2nd, 2017
Garrick Mallery

Garrick had this 3 years ago

Garrick had this 3 years ago

Feb 27th, 2017