Joh. Bapt. Schäfer

Goldloch Riesling

9.31 ratings
-no pro ratings
Nahe, Germany
Riesling
Top Notes For
Aaron Tan

This was my favourite in a very interesting blind tasting involving 17' rieslings from 4 different German regions - Nahe, Rheinhessen, Rheingau, and Pfalz. The wines were hauntingly similar at the start, but started to reveal themselves when left to their own devices. The tasting reinforced my belief that German rieslings best show their terrior aged or post-ferment, unsulphured and straight from the tank/barrel.

Regardless, I kept coming back to this wine. It was perhaps the most open of the lot. I guess the vineyard does help here, given the typical opulence of Goldloch - something I picked up while helping Caroline at Diel. The nose definitely shows some ripeness, with apricots and quince dominating, but pulled back with aromas of fresh herbs. The palate's fleshy and salty, with some spicy intrigue, oily texture, and a driven acidity. It's so drinkable at the moment.

NB: I think I need to pay a little more attention to JB Schafer after this. I gotta admit, I might have gravitated towards the Wagner-Stempel if it wasn't a blind. JB Schafer doesn't have the rep yet, espeically given how little their kabi sold for in the last VDP auctions, but I reckon riesling drinkers will be caught off guard in the future if this winery continues in this trajectory.

This was my favourite in a very interesting blind tasting involving 17' rieslings from 4 different German regions - Nahe, Rheinhessen, Rheingau, and Pfalz. The wines were hauntingly similar at the start, but started to reveal themselves when left to their own devices. The tasting reinforced my belief that German rieslings best show their terrior aged or post-ferment, unsulphured and straight from the tank/barrel.

Regardless, I kept coming back to this wine. It was perhaps the most open of the lot. I guess the vineyard does help here, given the typical opulence of Goldloch - something I picked up while helping Caroline at Diel. The nose definitely shows some ripeness, with apricots and quince dominating, but pulled back with aromas of fresh herbs. The palate's fleshy and salty, with some spicy intrigue, oily texture, and a driven acidity. It's so drinkable at the moment.

NB: I think I need to pay a little more attention to JB Schafer after this. I gotta admit, I might have gravitated towards the Wagner-Stempel if it wasn't a blind. JB Schafer doesn't have the rep yet, espeically given how little their kabi sold for in the last VDP auctions, but I reckon riesling drinkers will be caught off guard in the future if this winery continues in this trajectory.

Jun 22nd, 2019